Extraordinary Item

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DEFINITION of 'Extraordinary Item'

Gains or losses included in a company's financial statements, which are infrequent and unusual in nature. These are usually explained further in the "notes to the financial statements."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Extraordinary Item'

These are the result of unforeseen and atypical events. They are usually accounted for separately so they don't skew the company's regular earnings.

An example would be a snowstorm in Hawaii creating extraordinary losses to banana crops. These losses might be written down as a one-time charge due to an extraordinary item.

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