Facility Operations

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DEFINITION of 'Facility Operations'

Includes all the services required to ensure a facility will do what it is designed to do. Facility operations typically includes the day to day operations of the facility. Depending on the industry, each facility will operate differently.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Facility Operations'

An example would be a manufacturing facility. It could be broken down into process, production and maintanence departments with each department having teams to oversee. The facility operations are the way each department and the teams work and help the manufacturing facility attain its goals.

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