Facility Operations

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Facility Operations'

Includes all the services required to ensure a facility will do what it is designed to do. Facility operations typically includes the day to day operations of the facility. Depending on the industry, each facility will operate differently.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Facility Operations'

An example would be a manufacturing facility. It could be broken down into process, production and maintanence departments with each department having teams to oversee. The facility operations are the way each department and the teams work and help the manufacturing facility attain its goals.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Business Activities

    Any activity that is engaged in for the primary purpose of making ...
  2. Business Logic

    Custom rules or algorithms that handle the exchange of information ...
  3. Business Model

    The plan implemented by a company to generate revenue and make ...
  4. Cost Test

    A standard test applied to a process to determine if the net ...
  5. Enterprise Investment Scheme (EIS)

    A UK program that helps smaller, riskier companies to raise capital ...
  6. Maquiladora

    A Spanish term for a factory located near the United States-Mexico ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the most common business deductions and expenses for small businesses?

    Among the most common expenses and business deductions for small businesses are the expenses of getting the business started, ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the most common instances to use hire purchases in a small business?

    Hire purchases are commonly used to acquire high-dollar business assets, such as technology equipment, transportation fleets ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How is the concept of long tail growth used in marketing?

    Long-tail marketing refers to a business stocking a great variety of products that are not fast sellers to make huge total ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are some advantages and disadvantages of value chain analysis?

    There are many advantages of value chain analysis, which all result in a company's ability to understand and optimize the ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do you write off impaired assets from the financial statement?

    An accountant writes off an impaired asset by decreasing the book value of that asset on the company's balance sheet from ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Why should companies invest in research and development?

    Companies should invest in research and development (R&D) to create new and innovative products and add features to old ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Entrepreneurship

    Six Steps To A Better Business Budget

    This easy but essential process helps owners ensure that their businesses can stay afloat.
  2. Entrepreneurship

    New Year Planning For Business Owners

    Make a resolution to start your business off on the right foot in the new year.
  3. Entrepreneurship

    Getting To Know Business Models

    Learning how to assess business models helps investors identify companies that are the best investments.
  4. Professionals

    Top Strategies to Attract Elite Clients

    Here's how to think outside of the box when it comes to attracting a high-net-worth client base.
  5. Professionals

    How Financial Advisors Can Tweet Like Pros

    A quick guide to how advisors can tweet like the elite.
  6. Entrepreneurship

    How Small Businesses Can Guard Against Cybercrime

    Once a small business decides to establish an online presence, implementing certain guidelines is a vital step in order to minimize the risk and harm that can result from cybercrime.
  7. Professionals

    Advisors Evenly Split on Robo-Advisors' Relevance

    A new study finds that advisors are split on the impact of robo-advisors.
  8. Economics

    Understanding Implicit Costs

    An implicit cost is any cost associated with not taking a certain action.
  9. Economics

    What are Deliverables?

    Deliverables is a project management term describing an object or function that must be provided or completed by a certain due date.
  10. Economics

    What Does Capital Intensive Mean?

    Capital intensive refers to a business or industry that requires a substantial amount of money or financial resources to engage in its specific business.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  2. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  3. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  4. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
  5. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
  6. Current Account Deficit

    A measurement of a country’s trade in which the value of goods and services it imports exceeds the value of goods and services ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!