Fair Credit Billing Act - FCBA

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DEFINITION

A federal law designed to protect consumers from unfair credit billing practices. The Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA) provides guidelines for both consumers and creditors including procedures to manage disputes regarding billing statements. In addition, any interest accrued on the billing error has to be dropped if your claim is confirmed.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

One of FCBA's provisions states that consumers with a dispute must notify the creditor in writing within 60 days of a billing statement and the creditor must acknowledge receipt of the letter within 30 days. Examples of billing errors include charging the wrong account, calcuation errors and charges for goods that haven't been received.


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