Fair Labor Standards Act - FLSA

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DEFINITION of 'Fair Labor Standards Act - FLSA'

A United States law which sets out various labor regulations regarding interstate commerce employment, including minimum wages, requirements for overtime pay and limitations on child labor. In general, the FLSA is intended to protect workers against certain unfair pay practices or work regulations. The Fair Labor Standards Act is one of the most important laws for employers to understand since it sets out a wide array of regulations for dealing with employees.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Fair Labor Standards Act - FLSA'

The law goes on to specify at which times workers are "on the clock" and which times are not paid hours. There are also elaborate rules concerning whether employees are exempt or non-exempt from Fair Labor Standards Act overtime regulations. The FLSA requires overtime to be paid at 1.5 times the regular hourly rate for all hours worked in excess of 40 hours during a seven-day work week.

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