Fairness Opinion

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DEFINITION of 'Fairness Opinion'

A report evaluating the facts of a merger or acquisition. Fairness opinions are compiled by qualified analysts or advisors, usually of an investment bank, for key decision makers. The report examines the fairness of the offered acquisition price.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Fairness Opinion'

A fairness opinion provides guidance to the parties involved in a merger, takeover or acquisition. This could include the shareholders of the company being acquired or the acquiring company. It is essentially a professional opinion supported by collected data, for a fee.

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