Family And Medical Leave Act - FMLA

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Family And Medical Leave Act - FMLA'

The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) was signed into law on August 5, 1993 by President Bill Clinton. The FMLA is a labor law requiring larger employers to provide employees unpaid leave for serious health conditions, to care for a sick family member, or to care for a newborn or adopted child.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Family And Medical Leave Act - FMLA'

An employee who takes unpaid leave that falls under the FMLA is job-protected; that is, the employee can return to the same position held before the leave began. If the same position is unavailable, the employer must provide a position that is substantially equal in pay, benefits and responsibility. To qualify for FMLA, an employee must be employed by a business with 50 or more employees within a 75 mile radius of his or her work site. The employee must have worked for the employer for at least 12 months and 1,250 hours within the last 12 months. The FMLA mandates unpaid, job-protected leave for up to 12 weeks a year.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Presenteeism

    A loss of workplace productivity resulting from employee health ...
  2. Absenteeism

    The habitual non-presence of an employee at his or her job. Possible ...
  3. Workers' Compensation

    A state-sponsored system that pays monetary benefits to workers ...
  4. Furlough

    A temporary layoff, involuntary leave or other modification of ...
  5. Department Of Labor - DOL

    A U.S government cabinet body responsible for standards in occupational ...
  6. Employee Benefits Security Administration ...

    A division of the Department of Labor (DOL) charged with enforcing ...
Related Articles
  1. Retirement

    Building An Emergency Fund

    Do you have enough savings to cover the costs of unforeseen crises? We show you how to plan ahead.
  2. Options & Futures

    Live Longer, Retire Younger: Can You Do It?

    Use this vehicle to make sure your payout lasts as long as you do.
  3. Fundamental Analysis

    Why would I need to know how many outstanding shares the shareholders have?

    Find out why shareholders should know how many outstanding shares have been issued by a corporation, and learn what happens when more shares are issued.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    How do you use Microsoft Excel to calculate liquidity ratios?

    Learn how to calculate the most common liquidity ratios in Microsoft Excel by inputting financial figures from a company's balance sheet.
  5. Economics

    America's Most Notorious Corporate Criminals

    Learn about the crimes and punishments of some of the most infamous convicted white-collar crooks.
  6. Professionals

    How do you protect yourself against sudden unemployment?

    Learn the steps you can take to protect yourself from unexpected job loss and how you can turn a potentially desperate time into a career opportunity.
  7. Insurance

    How do you financially prepare yourself for unemployment?

    Lean some simple ways that you can financially prepare for the possibility of unemployment. Read information for saving money and avoiding debt.
  8. Personal Finance

    What are the top trends in corporate social responsibility?

    Learn about top trends in corporate social responsibility. Companies are increasing transparency, innovating, investing locally and addressing inequalities.
  9. Investing Basics

    What is revenue cycle management?

    Learn more about revenue cycle management and why the healthcare industry in particular has adopted this payment process philosophy.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    Is it important for a company always to have a high liquidity ratio?

    Understand the significance of the liquidity ratio and how it is used in conjunction with other measures to arrive at an overall evaluation of a company.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest ...
  2. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  3. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  4. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
  5. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
  6. Federal Funds Rate

    The interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds maintained at the Federal Reserve to another depository institution ...
Trading Center