Free Carrier - FCA

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DEFINITION of 'Free Carrier - FCA'

A trade term requiring the seller to deliver goods to a named airport, terminal, or other place where the carrier operates. Costs for transportation and risk of loss transfer to the buyer after delivery to the carrier.

When used in trade terms, the word "free" means the seller has an obligation to deliver goods to a named place for transfer to a carrier.

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BREAKING DOWN 'Free Carrier - FCA'

Contracts involving international transportation often contain abbreviated trade terms that describe matters such as the time and place of delivery and payment, when the risk of loss shifts from the seller to the buyer, and who pays the costs of freight and insurance.

The most commonly known trade terms are Incoterms, which are published by the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC). These are often identical in form to domestic terms, such as the American Uniform Commercial Code, but have different meanings. As a result, parties to a contract must expressly indicate the governing law of their terms.

It's important to realize that because this is a legal term, its exact definition is much more complicated and differs by country. It is recommened that you contact an international trade lawyer before using any trade term.

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