Foreign Currency Fixed Deposit - FCFD

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DEFINITION of 'Foreign Currency Fixed Deposit - FCFD'

A fixed investment instrument in which a specific sum of money with an agreed upon time and interest rate is deposited into a bank. Although fixed deposits have virtually no risk, foreign currency fixed deposits introduce an element of risk because investors must exchange their currency into the target currency and then covert it back again once the term is over.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Foreign Currency Fixed Deposit - FCFD'

When foreign currency fixed deposits are larger and longer in duration, they receive much higher interest rates. An FCFD can be a very useful and safe way to invest your money. However, you must make sure that you do not need that money for the entire duration of the term.

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