Featherbedding

DEFINITION of 'Featherbedding'

Term used to describe the practice of a labor union requiring an employer to hire more workers than necessary for a particular task.

BREAKING DOWN 'Featherbedding'

Featherbedding has developed over time as unions respond to workers being laid off because of technological change. These lay-offs have caused unions to seek some way to retain workers, even though there may be little work for them to perform.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. How does someone commit featherbedding?

    Featherbedding describes the practice where businesses hire more workers than are necessary to carry out particular tasks. ... Read Answer >>
  2. Do businesses in states with right-to-work laws have demonstrably less deadweight ...

    Learn more about the economic impact of right-to-work laws and how unions impact production and purchase levels. Explore ... Read Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between a state and a federally chartered credit union?

    Learn how federal chartered credit unions are regulated by the NCUA, while state chartered unions are regulated by their ... Read Answer >>
  4. Does the FDIC cover credit unions?

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