Featherbedding

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DEFINITION of 'Featherbedding'

Term used to describe the practice of a labor union requiring an employer to hire more workers than necessary for a particular task.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Featherbedding'

Featherbedding has developed over time as unions respond to workers being laid off because of technological change. These lay-offs have caused unions to seek some way to retain workers, even though there may be little work for them to perform.

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  1. How does someone commit featherbedding?

    Featherbedding describes the practice where businesses hire more workers than are necessary to carry out particular tasks. ... Read Full Answer >>
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    Deadweight loss from union activity is believed to represent as much as 0.04% of the gross domestic product (GDP) as of 2 ... Read Full Answer >>
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    The major expenses that affect companies in the airline industry are labor and fuel costs. Labor costs are largely fixed ... Read Full Answer >>
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