Featherbedding

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DEFINITION of 'Featherbedding'

Term used to describe the practice of a labor union requiring an employer to hire more workers than necessary for a particular task.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Featherbedding'

Featherbedding has developed over time as unions respond to workers being laid off because of technological change. These lay-offs have caused unions to seek some way to retain workers, even though there may be little work for them to perform.

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