DEFINITION of 'Featherbedding'

Term used to describe the practice of a labor union requiring an employer to hire more workers than necessary for a particular task.

BREAKING DOWN 'Featherbedding'

Featherbedding has developed over time as unions respond to workers being laid off because of technological change. These lay-offs have caused unions to seek some way to retain workers, even though there may be little work for them to perform.

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  1. How does someone commit featherbedding?

    Featherbedding describes the practice where businesses hire more workers than are necessary to carry out particular tasks. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do businesses in states with right-to-work laws have demonstrably less deadweight ...

    Deadweight loss from union activity is believed to represent as much as 0.04% of the gross domestic product (GDP) as of 2 ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are the major expenses that affect companies in the airline industry?

    The major expenses that affect companies in the airline industry are labor and fuel costs. Labor costs are largely fixed ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What inputs are considered to be factors of production?

    Factors of production are inputs used to produce an output, or goods and services. They are resources that a company requires ... Read Full Answer >>

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