Fed Balance Sheet

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DEFINITION of 'Fed Balance Sheet'

A breakdown of the assets and liabilities held by the Federal Reserve. This report essentially outlines the factors that affect both the supply and the absorption of Federal Reserve funds. The Fed balance sheet report reveals the means the Fed uses to inject cash into the economy and is formally known as the Factors Affecting Reserve Balances Report.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Fed Balance Sheet'

The weekly balance sheet report became popular in the media during the financial crisis starting in 2007. The Fed balance sheet gave analysts an idea of the scope and scale of Fed market operations being used at the time. In particular, the Fed balance sheet allowed analysts to see details surrounding implementation of an expansionary monetary policy used during the 2007-2009 crisis.

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