Fed Balance Sheet


DEFINITION of 'Fed Balance Sheet'

A breakdown of the assets and liabilities held by the Federal Reserve. This report essentially outlines the factors that affect both the supply and the absorption of Federal Reserve funds. The Fed balance sheet report reveals the means the Fed uses to inject cash into the economy and is formally known as the Factors Affecting Reserve Balances Report.

BREAKING DOWN 'Fed Balance Sheet'

The weekly balance sheet report became popular in the media during the financial crisis starting in 2007. The Fed balance sheet gave analysts an idea of the scope and scale of Fed market operations being used at the time. In particular, the Fed balance sheet allowed analysts to see details surrounding implementation of an expansionary monetary policy used during the 2007-2009 crisis.

  1. Balance Sheet

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  2. Cash Flow

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  3. Federal Funds

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  4. Fundamental Analysis

    A method of evaluating a security that entails attempting to ...
  5. Income Statement

    A financial statement that measures a company's financial performance ...
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    A method of evaluating securities by analyzing statistics generated ...
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