Federal Energy Regulatory Commission - FERC

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Federal Energy Regulatory Commission - FERC'

An independent agency responsible for regulating interstate oil and gas pipelines and sales, as well as the transmission of electricity from state to state. In addition, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 charged the FERC with further duties, such as imposing mandatory standard regulations. The FERC also regulates expansion projects and the operations of gas pipelines.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Federal Energy Regulatory Commission - FERC'

The FERC ensures that energy business matters are conducted in proper ethical fasion. For example, it investigates potential fraud and manipulation in the markets, and make sure that consumers have proper access to natural gas when needed.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Energy Institute - EI

    An organization based in London, England, that was formed as ...
  2. Wholesale Energy

    A term referring to the purchase and sale of energy products ...
  3. Energy And Commerce Committee

    A established by in 1975 by the United States House of Representatives ...
  4. Energy Tax Credit

    An energy tax credit is given to homeowners who make their homes ...
  5. Renewable Energy Certificate - ...

    A certificate that is proof that one megawatt-hour (MWh) of electricity ...
  6. Energy Sector

    A category of stocks that relate to producing or supplying energy. ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Are there any exceptions to the law of demand?

    The law of demand applies in market economies and may operate differently for different products, markets and industries. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Besides Porter's 5 forces, what other forces shape industry in the 21st century?

    Competition, potential new competition, supplier power, buyer power and the threat of new substitute products, also known ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does a government raise the economy's money supply?

    The government can raises the money supply by loosening money or the reserve requirement for banks. Both actions work to ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does contractionary fiscal policy lead to the opposite of the crowding out effect?

    According to general equilibrium models in contemporary macroeconomics, expansionary fiscal policy could cause crowding out ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are some examples of free market economies?

    According to a 2007 study, the most economically free countries in the world are Hong Kong, Singapore, Australia and the ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between a monopolistic market and monopolistic competition?

    A monopolistic market is an economic market structure that exists when there is only one supplier of a particular good or ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    Pockets Of Value In The Stock Market

    U.S. stocks benefited from signs the Fed’s path toward higher interest rates, as well as from continued merger-and-acquisition activity on of low rates.
  2. Economics

    Ending The Limits On U.S. Crude Oil Exports

    As US storage capacity reaches its limit, industry participants and their lobby groups in Washington are calling for an end to the crude oil exports ban.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    How To Start a Hedge Fund In the United States

    A general overview of how to start a hedge fund firm in the United States, including complying with state and federal regulations.
  4. Investing News

    Green Technology: A Solid Investment Choice?

    With global investing in green energy on the rise, there are abundant opportunities for environmentally responsible, financially sound investments.
  5. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    How To Start A Hedge Fund In The UK

    Starting a new hedge fund in the United Kingdom is more complex than in the United States. We discuss UK laws and regulations for starting a new hedge fund.
  6. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    How To Start A Hedge Fund In Canada

    Would-be hedge fund managers in Canada need to understand the laws and regulations that must be followed in order to start a fund in the country.
  7. Active Trading Fundamentals

    Where And How To Trade Energy Stocks

    Energy futures set a high bar to entry for individual traders and investors, redirecting exposure into sector equities and exchange-traded funds.
  8. Professionals

    Is it Safe to Invest in MLPs Again?

    The best bet right now for investors seeking to play a rebound in the price of oil may very well be ETFs that invest in energy MLPs.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Want to Go Long Natural Gas? Eye the UGAZ ETN

    Is UGAZ the best way to play natural gas? Maybe not.
  10. Chart Advisor

    These Oil Service Stocks Are Ready For A Move Higher

    In the oil services sector, active traders have been trying hard to establish a floor and the double bottom pattern that is appearing on the chart suggests that a short-term reversal could be ...

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Venture-Capital-Backed IPO

    The selling to the public of shares in a company that has previously been funded primarily by private investors. The alternative ...
  2. Merger Arbitrage

    A hedge fund strategy in which the stocks of two merging companies are simultaneously bought and sold to create a riskless ...
  3. Market Failure

    An economic term that encompasses a situation where, in any given market, the quantity of a product demanded by consumers ...
  4. Unsystematic Risk

    Company or industry specific risk that is inherent in each investment. The amount of unsystematic risk can be reduced through ...
  5. Security Market Line - SML

    A line that graphs the systematic, or market, risk versus return of the whole market at a certain time and shows all risky ...
  6. Tangible Net Worth

    A measure of the physical worth of a company, which does not include any value derived from intangible assets such as copyrights, ...
Trading Center