Federal Reserve Bank Of Dallas

DEFINITION of 'Federal Reserve Bank Of Dallas'

The Federal Reserve Bank located in Dallas, which is responsible for the 11th district. Its territory includes parts of the states of Louisiana and New Mexico, as well as the entire state of Texas. It operates several branches within the district.


The Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas is one of 12 reserve banks within the Federal Reserve System.

BREAKING DOWN 'Federal Reserve Bank Of Dallas'

The Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas is responsible for executing the central bank's monetary policy by reviewing price inflation and economic growth, and by regulating the banks within its territory. It provides cash to banks within its district and monitors electronic deposits. The president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas is part of a rotation of reserve bank presidents who, along with the seven governors of the Federal Reserve Board and the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, meet to set open market operations. This is referred to as the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC).


The Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas manages the United States' Electronic Transfer Account (ETA) program.


Bank notes printed by Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas are denoted by the mark "K11", representing the eleventh district (K is also the 11th letter of the alphabet).

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