Federal Reserve Bank Of San Francisco

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Federal Reserve Bank Of San Francisco'

The Federal Reserve Bank responsible for the twelfth district, located in San Francisco, CA. the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco's territory includes Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington. It is also responsible for American Samoa, Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands.


The Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco is one of 12 Reserve Banks within the Federal Reserve System. It is responsible for executing the central bank's monetary policy by reviewing price inflation and economic growth, and by regulating the banks within its territory. It provides cash to banks within its district, as well as monitor electronic deposits.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Federal Reserve Bank Of San Francisco'

Monetary policy is determined at the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meetings held eight times a year. The FOMC consists of 12 members, which include the seven Governors of the Federal Reserve Board, the President of the Federal Bank of New York, and four of the other 11 Bank presidents.




RELATED TERMS
  1. Federal Reserve Bank

    The central bank of the United States and the most powerful financial ...
  2. Federal Reserve Bank Of Richmond

    The Federal Reserve bank located in Richmond, Va.; it is responsible ...
  3. Federal Open Market Committee Meeting ...

    The meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) that ...
  4. Federal Open Market Committee - ...

    The branch of the Federal Reserve Board that determines the direction ...
  5. Beige Book

    A commonly used name for the Fed report called the Summary of ...
  6. Federal Reserve System - FRS

    The central bank of the United States. The Fed, as it is commonly ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. When has the United States run its largest trade deficits?

    In macroeconomics, balance of trade is one of the leading economic metrics that determines the trading relationship of a ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does the bond market react to changes in the Federal Funds Rate?

    The bond market is highly sensitive to changes in the federal funds rate. When the Federal Reserve increases the federal ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Which is more important to a nation's economy, the balance of trade or the balance ...

    There is no question the composition of a country's balance of payments is more important than its balance of trade. This ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why do commercial banks borrow from the Federal Reserve?

    Commercial banks borrow from the Federal Reserve primarily to meet reserve requirements when their cash on hand is low before ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the differences between the Federal Funds Rate and LIBOR?

    In macroeconomics, the interest rate plays a crucial role in delivering an equilibrium on the assets market by equating the ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the ethical arguments against government subsidies to companies like Tesla?

    The ethical argument behind government subsidies is that they should be put into place to help industries that will, in turn, ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Forex Education

    Get To Know The Major Central Banks

    The policies of these banks affect the currency market like nothing else. See what makes them tick.
  2. Retirement

    The 5 Most Influential Bankers Of All Time

    These bankers shaped the current financial system - though some didn't live to see the fruits of their labor.
  3. Personal Finance

    The Crash Of 1929 - Could It Happen Again?

    Learn about the series of events that triggered the Great Depression.
  4. Economics

    What Is a Quota?

    In business, quota usually refers to the sales target for a salesperson or a sales team.
  5. Economics

    What Does Infrastructure Mean?

    Examples of infrastructure include mass transit, communication, sewage, water and electric systems, plus roads, bridges and tunnels.
  6. Economics

    Calculating the GDP Price Deflator

    The GDP price deflator adjusts gross domestic product by removing the effect of rising prices. It shows how much an economy’s GDP is really growing.
  7. Economics

    What's a Centrally Planned Economy?

    A centrally planned economy is one where the government controls the country’s supply and demand of goods and services.
  8. Economics

    Why The Dollar’s Strength Can Continue

    Overall, the U.S. dollar has rallied this year, with the Dollar Index (DXY) now up by roughly 8 percent year-to-date, but the gain hasn’t been steady.
  9. Economics

    A Comparison Between a Default and a Collapse

    Is the Greek default similar to the Lehman Brothers collapse?
  10. Savings

    Inflation for Dummies

    Inflation may seem like a straightforward concept, but it is more complex than it appears. We examine its varieties and causes.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bogey

    A buzzword that refers to a benchmark used to evaluate a fund's performance. The benchmark is an index that reflects the ...
  2. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  3. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
  4. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  5. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  6. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!