Federal Trade Readjustment Allowance

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DEFINITION of 'Federal Trade Readjustment Allowance '

A form of income assistance to persons who have exhausted unemployment compensation and whose jobs were affected by foreign imports. The Federal Trade Act provides special benefits under the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program to those who were laid off or had hours reduced because their employer was adversely affected by increased imports. The increased imports need to be a result of trade arangements permitted under the Trade Act of 1974.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Federal Trade Readjustment Allowance '

A Federal Trade Readjustment Allowance (TRA) benefits include paid training for a new job, financial help in making a job search in other areas, or relocation to an area where jobs are more plentiful. Those who qualify may be entitled to a weekly TRA after their unemployment compensation is exhausted.

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