Federal Covered Advisor

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DEFINITION

An investment advisor in the United States that manages more than $25 million in assets for other investors or who is providing services in 30 or more states. Federal covered advisors are required to be registered and file annually with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). In addition, federal covered advisors must meet specific regulations set forth by individual states.


Also called federal covered investment advisor.






INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Federal covered advisors are required to file a notice with the state in which they plan to conduct investment advisor business. A state covered investment advisor is an investment advisory firm that has assets under management of less than $25 million. States require federal covered advisors to file a notice if the firm has six or more clients who are residents of that state, or if the firm is operating a place of business in that state.


The Investment Advisors Supervision Coordination Act, which became effective on July 8, 1997, was established to reallocate federal and state regulation of investment advisors. The Act was designed to make states responsible for smaller advisors and the SEC responsible for larger advisors.




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