Fed Model


DEFINITION of 'Fed Model'

A model thought to be used by the Federal Reserve that hypothesizes a relationship between long-term Treasury notes and the market return of equities. Many security analysts use this model in valuing equities.


The Fed doesn't endorse this tool. In fact, it was named the "Fed model" by Prudential Securities strategist Ed Yardeni.

This model suggests that returns on 10-year Treasury notes should be similar to the S&P 500 earnings yield. Differences in these returns identify an overpriced or underpriced securities market.

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  2. Alan Greenspan

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  3. Earnings Yield

    The earnings per share for the most recent 12-month period divided ...
  4. Federal Reserve Board - FRB

    The governing body of the Federal Reserve System. The seven members ...
  5. Standard & Poor's 500 Index - S&P ...

    An index of 500 stocks chosen for market size, liquidity and ...
  6. Treasury Note

    A marketable U.S. government debt security with a fixed interest ...
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