Fed Model

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DEFINITION of 'Fed Model'

A model thought to be used by the Federal Reserve that hypothesizes a relationship between long-term Treasury notes and the market return of equities. Many security analysts use this model in valuing equities.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Fed Model'

The Fed doesn't endorse this tool. In fact, it was named the "Fed model" by Prudential Securities strategist Ed Yardeni.

This model suggests that returns on 10-year Treasury notes should be similar to the S&P 500 earnings yield. Differences in these returns identify an overpriced or underpriced securities market.

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