Financial Institutions and Prudential Policy Unit - FIPP

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DEFINITION of 'Financial Institutions and Prudential Policy Unit - FIPP'

A division within the Centre for European Policy Studies. The Financial Institutions and Prudential Policy Unit (FIPP) is mainly a research unit which looks into four main areas of concern: regulation and supervision of financial institutions and financial stability; investigating size, diversity and innovation in the financial sector in Europe; internal market for financial services; positioning of small/ regional/ international financial centers.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Financial Institutions and Prudential Policy Unit - FIPP'

Each major research division is comprised of its own internal taskforce. This enables the FIPP to work at its most efficient and effective with minimal supervision needed from the CEPS. This division is an integral aspect of the crisis management program of the EU.

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