Field Audit


DEFINITION of 'Field Audit'

An audit is an investigation conducted by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) into a taxpayer's financial records and tax return(s). A field audit is a systematic investigation by the IRS that is conducted at the taxpayer's place of business or at the office of the individual who prepared the return.


A field audit is a comprehensive review of the entire set of financial records. It differs from a correspondence audit in that it is conducted in person rather than by mail. In addition, a field audit is typically scheduled for more complicated audits and is more serious.

  1. Audit

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  2. Notice Of Deficiency

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  3. Correspondence Audit

    Tax audits that the IRS performs by mail. Correspondence audits ...
  4. Tax Return

    1. The tax form or forms used to file income taxes with the Internal ...
  5. Internal Revenue Service - IRS

    A United States government agency that is responsible for the ...
  6. Revenue Agent

    An accountant who works for the U.S. Internal Revenue Service ...
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