Final Return For Decedent

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DEFINITION of 'Final Return For Decedent'

The final tax return filed for an individual in the year of that person's death. Taxpayers who die in any given year will have one final tax return filed on their behalf for this year. A copy of the death certificate must be attached to the return for it to be processed.

BREAKING DOWN 'Final Return For Decedent'

The decedent's executor or personal representative is usually responsible for filing the final return for the decedent. This return pertains solely to income taxes and should not be confused with the estate tax return. Income received after the taxpayer's death is also reported on this return.

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