Final Dividend

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DEFINITION of 'Final Dividend'

The final dividend declared at a company's Annual General Meeting (AGM) for any given year. This amount is calculated after all financial statements are recorded and the directors are aware of the company's profitability and financial health.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Final Dividend'

A term used more frequently in the United Kingdom, the final dividend is generally the largest payout by a company for a given year.

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  1. How can the price of a stock change on the ex-dividend date?

    An investor looking for a dividend-paying stock has two important dates to consider when investing in a company. The first ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How is the ex-dividend date for a dividend on a stock determined?

    The ex-dividend date is actually determined by the appropriate stock exchange, not by the company paying the dividend. The ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are the drawbacks of a small investor buying blue-chip stocks?

    Blue-chip stocks are generally safer for investors. However, their drawbacks for small investors include moderate growth ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the average annual dividend yield of companies in the automotive sector?

    As of May 2015, using trailing 12-month data, the annual dividend yields of industries in the automotive sector are 1.01% ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between Book Value Of Equity Per Share (BVPS) and book value ...

    There is no difference between book value of equity per share (BVPS) and book value over equity. The equation for a company's ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can I find out the ex-dividend date for a stock's dividend?

    Existing shareholders of a company's stock receive notification, typically by mail, when the company declares a dividend ... Read Full Answer >>
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