Financial Advisor

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DEFINITION

One who provides financial advice or guidance to customers for compensation. Financial advisors can provide many different services, such as investment management, income tax preparation and estate planning. They must carry the Series 65 license in order to conduct business with the public. A wide variety of licenses are available for the services that a financial advisor can provide.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Financial advisor is a generic term, and many different types of financial professionals fall into this general category. Stockbrokers, insurance agents, tax preparers and financial planners are all members of this group. Estate planners and bankers may fall under this umbrella as well.


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