Financial Crisis Responsibility Fee

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DEFINITION of 'Financial Crisis Responsibility Fee'

A tax proposed in 2010 to be levied on financial firms that received money from the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP). The Financial Crisis Responsibility Fee would continue to be used until the United States recoups the costs from stabilizing Wall Street during the 2007-2010 financial crisis.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Financial Crisis Responsibility Fee'

The Financial Crisis Responsibility Fee is designed to be levied on the highly-leveraged firms considered to be at the root of the 2007-2010 financial crisis, and will mostly likely affect larger financial firms.

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