Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery And Enforcement Act - FIRREA

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DEFINITION of 'Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery And Enforcement Act - FIRREA'

A law enacted to ensure that real estate appraisals are performed up to standard. This includes regulation on the competency of the appraisers, supervisory standards and accurate and full documentation. The FIRREA also holds claim to the creation of the Resolution Trust Corporation, the restructuring of the regulation authority, the abolishment of the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation and the creation of the Savings Association Insurance Fund and the Bank Insurance Fund.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery And Enforcement Act - FIRREA'

The FIRREA was enacted in 1989 following the savings and loan crisis. Its purpose was to create a more efficient, productive and effective base on which to build the industry and better serve as a safeguard for future transactions.

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