Financial Responsibility Law

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DEFINITION of 'Financial Responsibility Law'

A law which requires an individual to prove that he or she is able to pay for damages resulting from an accident. A financial responsibility law does not specifically require the individual to have insurance coverage; instead, the law requires the individual to be able to demonstrate the financial capacity to pay, even if the individual is not at fault. This type of law is commonly associated with automobiles.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Financial Responsibility Law'

Financial responsibility laws exist because not all states have a compulsory insurance law. However, many states consider an individual with an insurance policy to be compliant with a financial responsibility law, since most insurance policies have a minimum coverage that meets the state standard.

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