Financial Services Agency - FSA

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DEFINITION of 'Financial Services Agency - FSA '

The Japanese government entity responsible for overseeing banking, insurance and securities and exchange. The role of the Financial Services Agency is to ensure the stability of Japan's financial system; the protection of depositors, insurance policyholders and securities investors; and the inspection, supervision and surveillance and transparency of the financial system.


The FSA was established in July of 2000 under the jurisdiction of the Financial Reconstruction Commission through the reorganization of the Financial Supervisory Agency. It is headquartered in Tokyo, Japan.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Financial Services Agency - FSA '

Following the reorganization of Japan's central government ministries, the FSA became an external entity of the Cabinet Office. The FSA handles:
• Planning and policymaking regarding Japan's financial system


• Supervision of private sector financial institutions


• Development of rules for trading in markets


• Development of business accounting standards


• Supervision of CPAs and auditing firms


• Compliance of rules in financial markets

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