Financial Services Authority - FSA

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Financial Services Authority - FSA '

Regulating body for all providers of financial services in the United Kingdom. The Financial Services Authority (FSA) is an independent, non-governmental entity that receives its statutory powers through the Financial Services and Markets Act of 2000. The company is funded entirely by firms that it regulates within the financial services industry, and is accountable to Treasury Ministers and Parliament. The statutory objectives of the Financial Services Authority are to ensure market confidence, financial stability, consumer protection and the reduction of financial crime.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Financial Services Authority - FSA '

The Financial Services Authority is governed by a Board that is appointed by the U.K.'s Treasury. The majority of Board members are non-executive. In addition to the Board, FSA's management structure includes a Chief Executive Officer (CEO), a Chief Operating Officer (COO) and two managing directors. In 1997, the decision to merge banking supervision and investment services regulation into the Securities and Investments Board (SIB) was made. The SIB changed its name later that year to the Financial Services Authority (FSA). The FSA has the responsibilities of several organizations including the Personal Investment Authority (PIA), the Securities and Futures Authority (SFA), and mortgage regulation.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Securities And Exchange Commission ...

    A government commission created by Congress to regulate the securities ...
  2. London Stock Exchange - LSE

    The primary stock exchange in the U.K. and the largest in Europe. ...
  3. EUREX

    The largest futures and options market in the world, dealing ...
  4. Euronext

    A cross-border European stock exchange, originally created in ...
  5. London International Financial ...

    A futures and options exchange in London, England that was modeled ...
  6. Administrative Order On Consent ...

    An agreement between an individual or business and a regulatory ...
Related Articles
  1. Taxes

    Changes In Tax Legislation And Regulation

    Keeping on top of these amendments can help you avoid penalties and take advantage of benefits.
  2. Entrepreneurship

    Government Regulations: Do They Help Businesses?

    These rules are in place to protect consumers and help businesses thrive at the same time.
  3. Economics

    The SEC: A Brief History Of Regulation

    The SEC has continued to make the market a safer place and to learn from and adapt to new scandals and crises.
  4. Economics

    The Pitfalls Of Financial Regulation

    Regulatory actions usually have lofty intentions that end up with unintended and negative consequences.
  5. Active Trading

    What Would Full Disclosure Mean For The Market?

    In the wake accounting scandals, more people are calling for full disclosure. But what would that even help?
  6. Investing Basics

    Policing The Securities Market: An Overview Of The SEC

    Find out how this regulatory body protects the rights of investors.
  7. Investing

    What is meant by "full disclosure"?

    Most likely, the "full disclosure" you're talking about refers to rules put in place by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) through Regulation FD in 2000. Under this SEC rule, companies ...
  8. Economics

    What Is Happening To The BRIC Economies?

    Ten years ago, it was about the BRIC countries –Brazil, Russia, India, and China, and it was thought that capitalizing their resources would elevate them.
  9. Insurance

    Avoid The No-Health-Insurance Penalty By Feb 15

    If you don't have health insurance, act NOW or you could owe penalties on your 2015 taxes, in addition to this year's.
  10. Economics

    The Economic and Social Effects of Corruption

    Corruption results in inefficiencies in the operations of emerging economies, and prevents such economies from reaching the maximum level of development.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
  2. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
  3. Federal Funds Rate

    The interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds maintained at the Federal Reserve to another depository institution ...
  4. Fixed Asset

    A long-term tangible piece of property that a firm owns and uses in the production of its income and is not expected to be ...
  5. Break-Even Analysis

    An analysis to determine the point at which revenue received equals the costs associated with receiving the revenue. Break-even ...
  6. Key Performance Indicators - KPI

    A set of quantifiable measures that a company or industry uses to gauge or compare performance in terms of meeting their ...
Trading Center