Financial Stability Oversight Council

DEFINITION of 'Financial Stability Oversight Council'

A committee led by the U.S. Treasury Secretary that is charged with monitoring the financial system, including identifying potential threats to the country's financial stability. The Financial Stability Oversight Council is composed of 10 voting and five non-voting members. The voting members include Treasury officials, Federal Reserve Board members and insurance experts.

BREAKING DOWN 'Financial Stability Oversight Council'

In response to the financial crisis that began in 2007, the FSOC was formed as part of the Dodd-Frank Act, which was signed into law by President Barack Obama on July 21, 2010. The council aims to promote market discipline and bring greater efficiency and transparency to the financial services industry.

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