Financial Stability Plan (FSP)

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DEFINITION of 'Financial Stability Plan (FSP)'

A plan unveiled by the Obama administration in April, 2009, that was designed to stabilize the U.S. economy during the financial crisis of 2008-2009. The Financial Stability Plan (FSP) promised to take measures to solidify the American banking system, securities markets, mortgage and consumer credit markets. This somewhat controversial plan came as a response to the 2008 fallout in the mortgage and financial markets.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Financial Stability Plan (FSP)'

The Financial Stability Plan (FSP) is estimated to cost the American taxpayer about $1 trillion. The FSP promised to create a new "public-private" governmental fund to absorb toxic assets and leverage private capital to stimulate the financial markets. It also aimed to further standardize the banking system and provide capital to unstable lending institutions. A consumer-business lending initiative was also included to restore consumer credit for stable borrowers.

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