Financial System

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DEFINITION of 'Financial System'

A financial system can be defined at the global, regional or firm specific level. The firm's financial system is the set of implemented procedures that track the financial activities of the company. On a regional scale, the financial system is the system that enables lenders and borrowers to exchange funds. The global financial system is basically a broader regional system that encompasses all financial institutions, borrowers and lenders within the global economy.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Financial System'

There are multiple components making up the financial system of different levels: Within a firm, the financial system encompasses all aspects of finances. For example, it would include accounting measures, revenue and expense schedules, wages and balance sheet verification. Regional financial systems would include banks and other financial institutions, financial markets, financial services In a global view, financial systems would include the International Monetary Fund, central banks, World Bank and major banks that practice overseas lending.

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