Financial Asset

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What is a 'Financial Asset'

A financial asset is an asset that derives value because of a contractual claim. Stocks, bonds, bank deposits, and the like are all examples of financial assets.

BREAKING DOWN 'Financial Asset'

Unlike land and property--which are tangible, physical assets--financial assets do not necessarily have physical worth.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Are stocks real assets?

    Learn why stocks are classified as financial assets, not real assets. Understand the properties that determine whether an ... Read Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between tangible and intangible assets?

    Discover the difference between tangible assets and intangible assets and the types of assets that are in each. Additionally, ... Read Answer >>
  3. Why should you invest in tangible assets?

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  4. What are some examples of fixed assets?

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  5. Are current assets liquid or capital?

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  6. How many types of markets can an investor choose from?

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