Financial Modeling

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DEFINITION of 'Financial Modeling'

The process by which a firm constructs a financial representation of some, or all, aspects of the firm or given security. The model is usually characterized by performing calculations, and makes recommendations based on that information. The model may also summarize particular events for the end user and provide direction regarding possible actions or alternatives.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Financial Modeling'

Financial models can be constructed in many ways, either by the use of computer software, or with a pen and paper. What's most important, however, is not the kind of user interface used, but the underlying logic that encompasses the model. A model, for example, can summarize investment management returns, such as the Sortino ratio, or it may help estimate market direction, such as the Fed model.

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