Financing Squeeze

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DEFINITION

A situation in which would-be borrowers find it difficult to obtain funds because lenders are afraid or unable to make loans. A financing squeeze can also occur if credit is available, but only at a price that is unaffordable for most potential borrowers. A severe financing squeeze was a major component of the Great Recession of 2008.



INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Causes of a financing squeeze, also known as a credit crunch, include increased lending risk (for example, because many borrowers have been defaulting on their loans) and/or increased capital requirements (when governments force banks to hold more money in their reserves). A financing squeeze can affect all types of potential borrowers, from large corporations to small businesses to individuals.




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