Financial Crimes Enforcement Network - FinCEN

DEFINITION of 'Financial Crimes Enforcement Network - FinCEN'

A network administered by the United States Department of the Treasury whose goal it is to prevent and punish criminals and criminal networks that participate in money laundering. FinCEN operates domestically and internationally, and it consists of three major players: law-enforcement agencies, the regulatory community and the financial-services community.

BREAKING DOWN 'Financial Crimes Enforcement Network - FinCEN'

By researching mandatory disclosures imposed on financial institutions, FinCEN tracks suspicious persons, their assets and their activities to make sure that money laundering is not occurring. FinCEN tracks everything from very complicated electronically based transactions to simple smuggling operations that involve cash. As money laundering is such a complicated crime, FinCEN seeks to fight it by bringing different parties together.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Money Laundering

    Money laundering is the process of creating the appearance that ...
  2. Suspicious Activity Report - SAR

    One of the tools provided under the Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) as ...
  3. Wire Fraud

    A situation where a person concocts a scheme to defraud or obtain ...
  4. Smurf

    Colloquial term for a money launderer. Also refers to one who ...
  5. Currency Transaction Report - CTR

    A bank form used in the United States to help prevent money laundering. ...
  6. Bank Secrecy Act - BSA

    Government legislation that was created in 1970 to prevent financial ...
Related Articles
  1. Taxes

    Tax Implications of Opening a Foreign Bank Account

    Learn about the tax implications of opening a foreign bank account, including accounts that generate earned or unearned income from overseas activity.
  2. Economics

    Online Investment Scams Tutorial

    To bamboozle someone out of their money is an age-old ruse. Learn about some of the gimmicks modern-day swindlers use and avoid becoming a statistic.
  3. Options & Futures

    Handcuffs And Smoking Guns: The Criminal Elements Of Wall Street

    From godfathers to perps, familiarize yourself with the "criminal elements" creeping around Wall Street.
  4. Personal Finance

    Pros And Cons Of Offshore Investing

    Tax loopholes are shrinking, but there are still plenty of viable prospects. Get the big picture.
  5. Economics

    Why Enron Collapsed

    Enron’s collapse is a classic example of greed gone wrong.
  6. Professionals

    4 Must Watch Films and Documentaries for Accountants

    Learn how these must-watch movies for accountants teach about the importance of ethics in a world driven by greed and financial power.
  7. Investing Basics

    4 Iconic Financial Companies That No Longer Exist

    Learn how poor management, frauds, scandals or mergers wiped out some of the most recognizable brands in the finance industry in the United States.
  8. Active Trading

    What Is A Pyramid Scheme?

    The FTC announced it had opened an official investigation of Herbalife, which has been accused of running a pyramid scheme. But what exactly does that mean?
  9. Investing Basics

    How Financial Statements Are Manipulated

    Financial statement manipulation is an ongoing problem, and investors who buy stocks or bonds should be aware of its signs and implications.
  10. Economics

    3 Notorious American White Collar Criminals

    Learn about the crimes and punishments of some of the most infamous convicted white-collar crooks.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are some high-profile examples of wash trading schemes?

    In 2012, the Royal Bank of Canada (RBC) was accused of a complex wash trading scheme to profit from a Canadian tax provision, ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are examples of inherent risk?

    Inherent risk is the risk imposed by complex transactions that require significant estimation in assessing the impact on ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between wash trading and insider trading?

    Wash trading is an illegal trading activity that artificially pumps up trading volume in a stock without the stock ever changing ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What impact did the Sarbanes-Oxley Act have on corporate governance in the United ...

    After a prolonged period of corporate scandals involving large public companies from 2000 to 2002, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Who are the most famous people convicted of insider trading?

    In finance, insider trading refers to the buying and selling of security by a person who has access to material non-public ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What's the difference between insider trading and insider information?

    Insider information is the knowledge of nonpublic material about a publicly traded company that may affect the stock's price. ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Presidential Election Cycle (Theory)

    A theory developed by Yale Hirsch that states that U.S. stock markets are weakest in the year following the election of a ...
  2. Super Bowl Indicator

    An indicator based on the belief that a Super Bowl win for a team from the old AFL (AFC division) foretells a decline in ...
  3. Flight To Quality

    The action of investors moving their capital away from riskier investments to the safest possible investment vehicles. This ...
  4. Discouraged Worker

    A person who is eligible for employment and is able to work, but is currently unemployed and has not attempted to find employment ...
  5. Ponzimonium

    After Bernard Madoff's $65 billion Ponzi scheme was revealed, many new (smaller-scale) Ponzi schemers became exposed. Ponzimonium ...
  6. Quarterly Earnings Report

    A quarterly filing made by public companies to report their performance. Included in earnings reports are items such as net ...
Trading Center