FINRA BrokerCheck

DEFINITION of 'FINRA BrokerCheck'

An information vehicle containing statistics on both past and present securities brokers and firms registered with FINRA. With FINRA BrokerCheck, an investor can find a firm's history, learn of any indiscretions and locate and identify popular choices among investors.

BREAKING DOWN 'FINRA BrokerCheck'

FINRA BrokerCheck was created by the Central Registration Depository. The database contains information on approximately 665,000 brokers and firms, as well as thousands of previously registered ones. FINRA BrokerCheck is also an explanatory tool that shows how to properly use and manage the information provided.

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