Firm

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DEFINITION of 'Firm'

A business organization, such as a corporation, limited liability company or partnership. Firms are typically associated with business organizations that practice law, but the term can be used for a wide variety or business operation units.

BREAKING DOWN 'Firm'

While business activities are typically conducted under the firm's name, the legal protection to employees or owners depends on the type of organization it was created under. Some organizational types, such as corporations, provide more protection than others.

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    The requirements for an entity to be considered a public limited company (PLC) include registration requirements, establishing ... Read Full Answer >>
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    In microeconomics, utility represents a way to relate the amount of goods consumed to the amount of happiness or satisfaction ... Read Full Answer >>
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    Just-in-time (JIT) inventory management focuses solely on the need to replenish inventory only when it is required, reducing ... Read Full Answer >>
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