Fiscal Neutrality

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Fiscal Neutrality '

Fiscal neutrality occurs when taxes and government spending are neutral, with neither having an effect on demand. Fiscal neutrality creates a condition where demand is neither stimulated nor diminished by taxation and government spending.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Fiscal Neutrality '

A balanced budget is an example of fiscal neutrality, where government spending is covered almost exactly by tax revenue – in other words, where tax revenue is equal to government spending.
A situation where spending exceeds the revenue generated from taxes is called a fiscal deficit and requires the government to borrow money to cover the shortfall. When tax revenues exceed spending, a fiscal surplus results, and the excess money can be invested for future use.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Taxation

    Taxation refers to the act of a taxing authority actually levying ...
  2. Government Purchases

    Expenditures made in the private sector by all levels of government, ...
  3. Economics

    A social science that studies how individuals, governments, firms ...
  4. Microeconomics

    The branch of economics that analyzes the market behavior of ...
  5. Macroeconomics

    The field of economics that studies the behavior of the aggregate ...
  6. Tenured Capital

    Loans offered by the government to key business sectors.
RELATED FAQS
  1. How does neoclassical economics relate to neoliberalism?

    While it may be likely that many neoliberal thinkers endorse the use of (or even emphasize) neoclassical economics, the two ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the main risks to the economy of a country that has implemented a policy ...

    The main risk to the economy of a country that has implemented a policy of austerity is the potential for a self-reinforcing, ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. In what manner will a recession likely affect the marginal-propensity-to-save rate ...

    The marginal propensity to save, or MPS, rises in most, though not all, recessions. This makes perfect sense on an individual ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why would a country's gross domestic product (GDP) and gross national income (GNI) ...

    A country’s gross domestic product, or GDP, and gross national income, or GNI, are likely to differ considerably because ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. While closely related, how do gross domestic product (GDP) and gross national income ...

    Gross domestic product, or GDP, and gross national income, or GNI, are the two most important economic indicators that measure ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the major laws (acts) regulating financial institutions that were created ...

    Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, in conjunction with Congress, signed into law several major legislative responses ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    What Is Fiscal Policy?

    Learn how governments adjust taxes and spending to moderate the economy.
  2. Economics

    What The National Debt Means To You

    The U.S. deficit seems to grow every year. But how does it actually affect you?
  3. Economics

    Debt Monetization: A Nearsighted Government Policy?

    We look at whether this financial practice benefits a government in the long term.
  4. Options & Futures

    Explaining The World Through Macroeconomic Analysis

    From unemployment and inflation to government policy, learn what macroeconomics measures and how it affects everyone.
  5. Economics

    Is Texas The Future Of America?

    The top three fastest-growing cities are located in Texas and 20% of jobs created between 2009 and 2014 were in the Lone Star State.
  6. Insurance

    Why Is Health Care So Expensive In The Us?

    The U.S. is the world leader in only one area of health care: costs. Why is it so hard to rein in these expenses?
  7. Economics

    Understanding Limited Liability

    Limited liability is a legal concept that protects equity owners from personal losses due to their ownership interest in the company.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining the Empirical Rule

    The empirical rule provides a quick estimate of the spread of data in a normal statistical distribution.
  9. Economics

    Explaining Demographics

    Demographics is the study and categorization of people based on factors such as income level, education, gender, race, age, and employment.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Degree of Financial Leverage

    Degree of financial leverage (DFL) is a metric that measures the sensitivity of a company’s operating income due to changes in its capital structure.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  2. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  3. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  4. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
  5. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
  6. Current Account Deficit

    A measurement of a country’s trade in which the value of goods and services it imports exceeds the value of goods and services ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!