Fiscal Agent

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DEFINITION of 'Fiscal Agent'

An organization, such as a bank or trust company, that acts on behalf of another party performing various financial duties. A fiscal agent may assist in the redemption of bonds or coupons, handle tax issues, replace lost or damaged securities and perform various other finance-related tasks.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Fiscal Agent'

Fiscal agents (or fiscal sponsors) are most often seen in the non-profit sector. Many non-profit organizations don't have a lot of experience managing the administrative aspects of a business, while others do not have the required 501(c)(3) status needed to legally operate one. In both cases, a fiscal agent can help by providing limited financial and legal oversight for groups and individuals. Those seeking a fiscal agent should do their homework, however, as the IRS rules governing such arrangements can be tricky.




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