5 By 5 Power In Trust

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DEFINITION of '5 By 5 Power In Trust'

A common clause included in many trusts allowing for beneficiary withdrawals from the trust. Specifically, '5 by 5 Power' or the '5 by 5 clause', gives the beneficiary power to withdraw the greater of: a) $5,000 or b) 5% of the trust's fairmarket value from the trust each year.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS '5 By 5 Power In Trust'

For income tax purposes, should the beneficiary not exercise the '5 by 5 Powers', over time the beneficiary could become the owner of the trust and become liable for taxes on the trust's capital gains, deductions and income.

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