Fixed-Asset Turnover Ratio

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DEFINITION of 'Fixed-Asset Turnover Ratio'

A financial ratio of net sales to fixed assets. The fixed-asset turnover ratio measures a company's ability to generate net sales from fixed-asset investments - specifically property, plant and equipment (PP&E) - net of depreciation. A higher fixed-asset turnover ratio shows that the company has been more effective in using the investment in fixed assets to generate revenues.

The fixed-asset turnover ratio is calculated as:

Fixed-Asset Turnover Ratio

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Fixed-Asset Turnover Ratio'

This ratio is often used as a measure in manufacturing industries, where major purchases are made for PP&E to help increase output. When companies make these large purchases, prudent investors watch this ratio in following years to see how effective the investment in the fixed assets was.

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