Fixed Income

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DEFINITION of 'Fixed Income'

A type of investing or budgeting style for which real return rates or periodic income is received at regular intervals at reasonably predictable levels. Fixed-income budgeters and investors are often one and the same - typically retired individuals who rely on their investments to provide a regular, stable income stream. This demographic tends to invest heavily in fixed-income investments because of the reliable returns they offer.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Fixed Income'

Individuals who live on set amounts of periodically paid income face the risk that inflation will erode their spending power. Fixed-income investors receive set, regular payments that face the same inflation risk.

The most common type of fixed-income security is the bond; bonds are issued by federal governments, local municipalities or major corporations.

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