Fixed-Income Arbitrage

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DEFINITION of 'Fixed-Income Arbitrage'

An investment strategy that attempts to profit from arbitrage opportunities in interest rate securities. When using a fixed-income arbitrage strategy, the investor assumes opposing positions in the market to take advantage of small price discrepancies while limiting interest rate risk.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Fixed-Income Arbitrage'

Fixed-income arbitrage is primarily used by hedge funds and leading investment banks. The most common fixed-income arbitrage strategy is swap-spread arbitrage. This consists of taking opposing long and short positions in a swap and a Treasury bond. Such strategies provide relatively small returns and, in some cases, huge losses. That's why these strategies are often referred to as "picking up nickels in front of a steamroller"!

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What is arbitrage?

    Arbitrage is basically buying in one market and simultaneously selling in another, profiting from a temporary difference. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does beta measure a stock's market risk?

    Beta is a statistical measure of the volatility of a stock versus the overall market. It's generally used as both a measure ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How are swap agreements financed?

    Since swap agreements involve the exchange of future cash flows and are initially set at zero, there is no real financing ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the risks involved with swaps?

    The main risks associated with interest rate swaps, which are the most common type of swap, are interest rate risk and counterparty ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between compounding interest and simple interest?

    Interest is the cost of borrowing money, where the borrower pays a fee to the owner for using the owner's money. The interest ... Read Full Answer >>
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