Flat Benefit Formula

DEFINITION of 'Flat Benefit Formula'

A method of calculating an employer's contribution to an employee's defined benefit plan whereby the employer multiplies an employee's months of service by a predetermined flat monthly rate.

BREAKING DOWN 'Flat Benefit Formula'

There are three basic types of defined benefit plans: the flat benefit, unit benefit and variable benefit.

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