Flexible Spending Account - FSA

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DEFINITION of 'Flexible Spending Account - FSA'

A type of savings account available in the United States that provides the account holder with specific tax advantages. Set up by an employer for an employee, the account allows employees to contribute a portion of their regular earnings to pay for qualified expenses, such as medical expenses or dependent care expenses.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Flexible Spending Account - FSA'

One of the key benefits of a flexible spending account is that the funds contributed to the account are deducted from the employee's earnings before they are made subject to payroll taxes. As such, regular contributions to an FSA can significantly lower an employee's annual tax liabilities.

There are limits to how much can be contributed to an FSA account per year. For medical expense FSA accounts, the limit is set by the employer, while the specified limit for dependent care accounts is $5,000 per year.

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