Flextime

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DEFINITION of 'Flextime'

A work policy maintained by certain employers allowing employees to choose the times in which they work during the day. Flextime may mandate that employees being in the office during certain hours to allow for meetings and collaboration. However, flexibility is allowed for employees to schedule the remainder of their work day depending on their preferences.

BREAKING DOWN 'Flextime'

Ordinarily flextime still requires that employees maintain a certain number of total hours worked (for example 40 hours per week). However, even more progressive work systems may disregard work hours as a measure of productivity, and simply require that all of the employee's work be accomplished. Flextime works best when work is either highly individual in nature or information technology allows opportunities for asynchronous collaboration.

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