Flight To Quality

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DEFINITION

The action of investors moving their capital away from riskier investments to the safest possible investment vehicles. This flight is usually caused by uncertainty in the financial or international markets. However, at other times, this move may be an instance of investors cutting back on the more volatile investments for the conservative ones (i.e. diversifying) without much consideration of the international markets.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

For example, during a bear market investors will often move their money out of equities and into government securities and money market funds. Another example is investors moving investments from high-risk countries with political unrest and volatile economic conditions to less risky markets of other countries. One indication of a flight to quality is a dramatic fall of the yield on government securities, which is a result of the increased demand for them.


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