Flip-Flop Note

DEFINITION of 'Flip-Flop Note'

A type of fixed-income security that allows its holder to choose a payment stream from two different sources of debt. Flip-flop notes provide investors with two options of return, allowing them to choose the underlying debt with the higher yield for the period.

BREAKING DOWN 'Flip-Flop Note'

For example, a typical flip-flop note could be comprised of a fixed-rated debt and a floating-coupon bond. If the floating interest rate drops below the fixed coupon, the investor can choose to receive income from the fixed-rate debt. Inversely, when the floating rate exceeds the fixed coupon, the investor would switch to the floating-rate debt for income. In this situation, the flip-flop note is similar to a floating-rate bond with an interest rate floor.

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