Floor Limit

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DEFINITION of 'Floor Limit'

A purchase amount over which further authorization is needed by the merchant. The floor limit is a predetermined limit set by the merchant and the creditor.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Floor Limit'

The term originates from when most credit card transactions were done manually rather than electronically. It was a way to ensure that the credit was available to the consumer before the transaction was completed.

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