Flow-Through Entity

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DEFINITION of 'Flow-Through Entity'

A legal business entity that passes income on to the owners and/or investors. Flow-through entities are a common device used to limit taxation by avoiding double taxation. Only the investors/owners are taxed on revenues, not the entity itself.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Flow-Through Entity'

Also known as pass-through entities, flow-through entities are commonly grouped into limited, general and limited liability partnerships, along with income trusts and limited liability companies. Although flow-throughs are considered non-entities for tax purposes, U.S. law still requires flow-through entities to file an annual K-1 statement.

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