Focused Fund

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DEFINITION of 'Focused Fund'

A mutual fund which rather than holding a diversified mix of equity positions focuses on a limited number stocks in a limited number of sectors; unlike many funds which hold positions in excess of 100 companies, focused funds generally will hold less than 20-30 types of stocks.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Focused Fund'

Focused funds allocate their holdings between a limited number of carefully researched securities. Although they do not experience the benefits of diversification because of the "search for quality" strategy, focused funds rely on research expertise for above average stock picking. As a result, returns tend to be more volatile. This fund is also known as an "under-diversified fund" or "concentrated fund."






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