Follow-Up Action

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DEFINITION of 'Follow-Up Action'

Any subsequent trading that affects an established position in a security or derivative. Follow-up actions are taken to change the amount of exposure an investor has in a position, or to limit a strategy's losses or profits.

BREAKING DOWN 'Follow-Up Action'

For example, an investor who is long in shares of Company XYZ may be nervous about future losses. He or she could take the follow-up action of purchasing a put option for the stock, which would minimize losses in the event of a downturn.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. How does a forward contract differ from a call option?

    Forward contracts and call options are different financial instruments that allow two parties to purchase or sell assets ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the main risks associated with trading derivatives?

    The primary risks associated with trading derivatives are market, counterparty, liquidity and interconnection risks. Derivatives ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How can an investor profit from a fall in the utilities sector?

    The utilities sector exhibits a high degree of stability compared to the broader market. This makes it best-suited for buy-and-hold ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between derivatives and options?

    Options are one category of derivatives. Other types of derivatives include futures contracts, swaps and forward contracts. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How are rights distributed in a rights offering?

    In a rights offering, rights are distributed to shareholders based on the number of shares they already own. What Is a Rights ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What risks should I consider taking a short put position?

    The risks to consider before taking a short put position are the odds of sustained weakness in the asset price and a spike ... Read Full Answer >>

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